Hi!

I would love to hear your thoughts and feedback on the following issues as we are looking into organising an exclusive event for Risk executives.

Feel free to add any additional comments, suggestions or ideas that you would like to share.

1) What are the 4 key topics you would like to hear addressed on an event?
2) Would October/November or January/February be a good time of year for you to attend a 2-day event? (regarding internal business meetings, holidays, other events etc.)
3) Which guru would you like to see, hear and meet at the event?  
4) Which companies would you like to hear from and meet face-to-face?
5) Are there any other events that you plan to attend on Risk and Risk topics?
6) Which magazines and blogs do you read regularly?
7) Who would be the most senior executive from your company (Director, SVP, VP, Head) to invite to speak on this event?  
Thank you for your input!
Lisanne

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It really depends on where the event takes place.  For me the key risks are as follows:

 

1.  Counterparty credit risk and the impac of contagion from Europe and the global property market

2.  Capital raising and the impact of reducing RWAs

3.  Risk models and their problems in times of enhanced risk

4.  Risk governance, ERM and risk appetite modelling

 

From my point of view I am already really busy in October/November - these are peak months for us - as is February so I would opt for January.

 

Any event needs to take into account the other risk events that take place many of which always appear to have the same speakers going through the same materials.  There are not just the conferences but also the risk events run by specialist groupings (eg GARP and PRMIA - or my CISI group).  I hae seen many of the same speeches mutiple times which begins to make my attention reduce.

 

As amongst other things, being a speaker warehouse I would probably be our lead speaker for such an event.  Not sure about the eetings things - I suspect for us it would be the CROs and LPD departments of banks that we would be most interested in meeting together with the Heads of Internal Audit and Internal Control.   

Before any specifics, there are two basic principles on the origins of risk.

FIRST and most important principle, there are no black swans, no true surprises.  What we call black swans are in fact revelations of undetected correlations among specific risks.

Bhopal for example.  Three supposedly independent fail-safe mechanisms.  Unrecognized was that all three were maintained by under-trained, under-staffed operators. The link was the fail of maintenance, one risk, not three.

Or Fukushima.  The tsunami wall was high enough in the static case. against rationally remote wave height.  But the waves only occur with earthquakes, which also lowered the ground level and thus the wall.  Failure to connect the history of wave heights to the initiating event itself.

SECOND and nearly as important, is the principle that regulators are dangerous.  Meeting bureaucratic standards leads to complacency, as recent articles on the Titanic demonstrate.  "We have as many life boats as the Board of Trade SAYS we need..."

Robert Arvanitis,

 I really liked your opening premise of there being only two drivers of risk.  However, I think the examples you gave were perhaps somewhat down line in that problem supply chain and not the initial genesis of all cause-effect problem supply chains.

From my 50+ years’ experience in social and family life –as well as in my professional career (Series 7 & 63, CPA, chairman & Ex. Director of pension system turnarounds) the only two “Origins of All Risk” are:

I)  I don’t know the truth in how to respond. (truth being defined as “that which actually produces effective and efficient effects.”

II)  I don’t really want to know the truth. 

 

To say the same think in “B School” terms:

I)                    My Core Competency is lacking (the IQ's library of knowledge)

II)                  My Core Commitment is waning (the EQ's engine of passion)

 

And its from these two simple principiums that we create – as Peter Senge, systems theorist and author of “The Fifth Discipline - the ever diminishing ... self-amplifying system of aiding the entropic demise and destruction  of life’s purpose itself … I don’t want to … know how to … change my “thinking belief-systems”, actions and results. 

Which in turn also can be defined as ...  I don’t know how to … improve my want to …. change my “thinking belief-systems”, my actions and the results I create and have not created.

 

I don’t want to … know how to … and I don’t know how to … change my want to … a systemic dilemma of the preverbal snake eating its tail deep into metaphoric cavern of the ultimate agony of ignorance.

 

And in my personal opinion, it from these two core principles … of all universal manifestations … that this proposed Risk Workshop should contextually frame all content design and delivery.

Then after everyone feels like a real ignorant analyst ... we can give them the ultimate passport of freedom and self-bliss.  We are not our belief systems that we think with.  We are not the software we live, create and survive with.  Its the institutions that have sold us our life's software that is to blame.  We are totally blameless ... that is until we come to realize what even Carl Jung or Joseph Campbell were not shown. 

 

So please do have a great day ... thinking about what you are thinking with. :-)

LCarsonatATICA.US

:Lisanne,

Here are my responses to your 7 points.

1 - I would offer only one key topic - the need to have a broad overview of all an organizations risks. I say this because most organizations focus on risks they know and have little idea of fll the risks they face.

2 - October/November

3 - Glen Boyls of AMXi. You can read about him at www.amxi.com

4 - AMXi, COSO, DHS

5 - Am considering several

6 - Too many to list

7 - My self, Douglas Nagan, President  see our web site www.naganresearchgroup.com

You might also consider meeting companies that might hire candidates and networking too.

Thanks AntMar

Douglas Nagan said:

:Lisanne,

Here are my responses to your 7 points.

1 - I would offer only one key topic - the need to have a broad overview of all an organizations risks. I say this because most organizations focus on risks they know and have little idea of fll the risks they face.

2 - October/November

3 - Glen Boyls of AMXi. You can read about him at www.amxi.com

4 - AMXi, COSO, DHS

5 - Am considering several

6 - Too many to list

7 - My self, Douglas Nagan, President  see our web site www.naganresearchgroup.com

Lisanne,

I recently posted a blog on this titled "10 Reasons Why Your Enterprise Risk Management Program Wont Work".   Rather than repeating all the issues and challenges here is the link to the blog.

http://complispace.wordpress.com/2012/04/04/10-reasons-why-your-ent...



James Field said:

Lisanne,

I recently posted a blog on this titled "10 Reasons Why Your Enterprise Risk Management Program Wont Work".   Rather than repeating all the issues and challenges here is the link to the blog.

http://complispace.wordpress.com/2012/04/04/10-reasons-why-your-ent...

Please add Clem Sunter (ex chairman of Anglo American) to do a scenario planning session.

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