Hospital readmission fines – How video collaborative technologies can reduce the impact on hospitals and staff

This is an important week for many organizations in the healthcare industry, especially in the world of healthcare reform as “hospitals will be penalized up to 1 percent of their rates if too many patients with heart attacks, heart failure or pneumonia are readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of being discharged” according to a recent Washington Business Journal article.

 

However, as fines are being levied on hospitals that have high readmission rates among Medicare subscribers, now can be an important time for healthcare facilities to explore the use of technologies, like Video Teleconferencing (VTC), to engage with patients in their care and help empower patients to stay healthy. Ultimately, such technologies as discussed in this latest article by Polycom, can have an impact on an organizations bottom line.

 

What are your thoughts? Do you see other ways in which healthcare organizations can mitigate the effects of possible fines?

 

http://feduc.us/unified-communications/collaborative-video-for-heal...

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